Author Archives: Flossie Benton Rogers

About Flossie Benton Rogers

Paranormal romance author who loves to shake the edges of reality.

Fae Friday: Demeter’s Joy

FredericLeighton-TheReturnofPerspephone(1891)

Frederic Leighton [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

DEMETER’S JOY

Most of us have lost someone dear in our lives, whether a husband, child, parent, or friend. The hurt is unbearable. We can understand Demeter’s deep, gut wrenching sorrow at the sudden, stark disappearance of her beloved daughter Persephone, taken by the dark lord of the Underworld. In her misery the world turned barren and frost laden, and she did not care. She couldn’t care. Her agony was too great for her to summon up any shred of compassion for anyone else. The earth and earth dwellers who had been under her patronage now receded from her heart. Neither did she mingle with her fellow gods, as their pastimes were shallow and trivial. Only her grief was real. And then her anger.

Evelyn de Morgan - Demeter Mourning for Persephone, 1906

Evelyn De Morgan [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

From the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, translated by Gregory Nagy:

She would never go to fragrant Olympus,
…never send up the harvest of the earth,
until she saw with her own eyes her daughter, the one with the beautiful looks.

She begged heaven and hell to return her daughter. Begged from the deepest, most rage filled recesses of her soul. Time passed. Her pain continued. And then, in a miracle, her daughter returned.

I can imagine Demeter taken right out of her mind by the sheer overwhelming joy of the moment.

Alfred, LordTennyson put it this way:

Queen of the dead no more — my child! Thine eyes
Again were human-godlike, and the Sun
Burst from a swimming fleece of winter gray,
And robed thee in his day from head to feet —
“Mother!” and I was folded in thine arms.

Demeter rejoiced, for her daughter was by her side

Walter Crane [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

From the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Interlinear Translation
edited & adapted from the 1914 prose translation
by Hugh G. Evelyn-White:

And the whole earth laughed for joy.

To you and yours, best wishes to relish the beauty and pleasures of spring.
Cheers & Happy Reading!
Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

Tuesday Tales: Writing Hotel Window

Welcome to Tuesday Tales, a weekly blog featuring diverse authors who post excerpts from their works in progress based on word and picture prompts. We’re a book hungry troop that enjoys reading as much as you do. Today the picture prompts we selected from were types of windows. Mine reminded me of a hotel window. My excerpt is from one of my books in progress, Hannah’s Haint, a vintage paranormal romance set in a small town in the 1950s. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

Hannah breathed in the salty air. She hadn’t realized how much she had missed that uplifting scent. A purr of contentment vibrated across her lips.

From next to her on the car seat, Meg patted her arm. “Yep, I smell it, too. Nothing like beach air to shake out the cobwebs. You smell the salt, Bryan?”

The driver lifted a tanned hand from the wheel for emphasis. “I smell it five days a week, honey. Doesn’t do much for me anymore.”

Meg looked at Hannah and shook her head. “You ever hear such nonsense? Man gets to live on the beach five days out of seven and already takes it for granted.”

“Work on the beach, honey. Work. Through the week you won’t find me lying around on a big towel sipping drinks from paper cups like you two girls have planned.”

Photo by Alicia, copyright 2014

 

The slice of turquoise bobbing between buildings made Hannah’s heart beat faster. Soon Bryan turned between two hotels, driving out onto the bumpy white sand. An endless swatch of turquoise met a half globe of clearest blue, and the sight poured its majesty right down into her gut. 

The two women lugged out their numerous bags and began nesting in the sand as he drove off. Spreading out a towel, Hannah glanced up at the multi-story luxury hotel. Most of the drapes were still drawn, but one gave a wide open view of its occupant. A young woman clad in silk pajamas faced the window and stretched out her arms in exuberance. Despite puffy eyes that told of over indulgence last night, she obviously didn’t have a care in the wide world. Enjoying life. Vacationing here on her trust fund or her father’s money. A dull pain thudded between Hannah’s eyes. She pinched her brow. There before her loomed a mirror to her past. A phantom of her former life welcomed the morning rays. 

I hope you enjoyed the snippet based on the picture prompt of a hotel window. Thanks for stopping by. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

Cheers & Happy Reading!
Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fae Friday: What You Don’t Know of St. Patrick

Photograph copyright by Karen Barnett

HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY!

We don our green in honor of St. Patrick, the patron saint of the Emerald Isle. As a girl, my mother and I always got new green dresses for the occasion. At her restaurant, as many items as possible were dyed green, including the draft beer. At school, anyone not wearing green was pinched. I find it fascinating that green is also the color of nature and fairies, two aspects prominent in Irish culture. Do you celebrate the merry, festive St. Patrick’s Day, and if so, how?

  • The Irish patron saint, St. Patrick, was said to be born in Wales in 385 A.D.
  • His original Welsh name was Maewyn Succat.
  • Not an early practitioner, Maewyn converted to Christianity around age 16, after he was kidnapped and transported to Ireland as a slave.
  • His primary job during captivity was to care for the animals.
  • After his escape, he eventually studied under the renowned St. Germain at a monastery in Gaul.
  • His passion to convert pagans came about after a vision called him into service.
  • The Church stationed him in Ireland to win converts, and he remained on his mission for thirty years.
    British Library Royal 17 B XLIII St John of Bridlington in St Patricks Purgatory

    See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

  • He served as the first Bishop of Armagh.
  • He built churches, schools, and monasteries in Ireland to promote learning and the Christian faith.
  • Two of his written works survive in Latin: Declaration (also called Confession) and Letter to the Soldiers of Coroticus.
  • He used the three-leaf shamrock to explain the Trinity of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit to his followers.
  • Legend has it that he banished all snakes from Ireland.
  • He was known to raise the dead.
  • After striking his walking stick made of ash to the ground, the stick grew into a tree.
  • These famous and soothing words are attributed to him: “Christ beside me, Christ before me, Christ behind me, Christ within me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me.”
  • He lived 300 years before my favorite fictitious Irish sleuth, Sister Fidelma of the mysteries by Peter Tremayne. Have you read those incredible books?
  • St. Patrick died on March 17 in 471 A.D.

Mo sheacht mbeannacht ort!

(An old Irish blessing meaning “My seven blessings on you.”)
Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

Cover Reveal: Carmen Stefanescu’s Dracula’s Mistress

My online friend from Romania, Carmen Stefanescu, is unveiling a new book cover. Just looking at this splendid  cover and title, I am beside myself with anticipation to read the book! It is a “paranormal historical with a smidgen of romance.” Available at Amazon.

Congratulations to Carmen, and to my readers, cheers & happy reading!

Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

Tuesday Tales: Writing Lemon

Welcome to Tuesday Tales, a weekly blog featuring diverse authors who post excerpts from their works in progress based on word and picture prompts. We’re a book hungry troop that enjoys reading as much as you do. Today our word prompt is lemon. My excerpt is from one of my books in progress, Hannah’s Haint, a vintage paranormal romance set in a small town in the 1950s. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

 

At the sound of a commotion, Nate bounded up the stairs toward the attic landing. Hannah sped toward him, no hint of recognition on her features. He gripped her shoulders. When she tried to jerk away, he held on to keep her from tumbling down the stairs.

“Let me go!”

Her frenzied state alarmed him. “Calm down, Miss Ross. It’s Nate Larkin.”

She stared at him, unseeing.

“Hannah, it’s me. I’ve got you. You look like you’ve seen a ghost. What has happened?”

“Nate?” She collapsed against him.

He wrapped his arms around her, peering around with trained attention. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary, but he’d clear the space once he got her settled. No one would hurt her on his watch. Her nearness and soft warmth caught him off guard. His eyelids fluttered. The sugary lemon of her hair tantalized his senses. He breathed in the scent as if it were oxygen he’d been missing. Her body trembled. Protectiveness washed over him, merging with his heightened state.

After a few moments she pulled away. A rosy tint stained her cheeks. “Oh, I’m so sorry, Mr. Larkin. Please forgive me.”

“Nate.” He wouldn’t let her dismiss him. “You’re still distraught, Miss Ross. Come downstairs and sit down.” He maneuvered her down the steps. “Careful now.”

“I’m fine.”

He led her to the settee and lowered himself beside her, not wanting to loom over.

She focused on a spot on the wall and took several deep breaths. She seemed to gather in her distress, steeling her features into normalcy and calm. Only then did she turn her face to his. “I’m fine now. Truly. Thank you for your help. I’d better get busy. I have things to do.”

He raised a brow. “Not until you tell me what scared the daylights out of you.”

 

I hope you enjoyed the snippet based on the word prompt lemon. Thanks for stopping by. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

Cheers & Happy Reading!
Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

Fae Friday: Rune of the Day – Dagaz

Inner self, higher self, higher power, spirit, angels, goddess, fae, source. There are many names for the sacred wisdom underlying all. My old metaphysical teacher called it Spirit, and that’s how I tend to refer to it most times. We can call on it to guide us. How does it answer? The ways are countless, and one way is rune casting. This is an ancient method from the frozen north, used by Vikings and other Germanic cultures. Runes shine a light on the ripe possibilities of the moment. A casting also comes in many patterns and forms. For a quick casting, I draw one rune.

I close my eyes and ask Spirit for guidance, for a message. What do I need to know at this time? From my bag of amethyst runes, I draw a single stone. I listen with open mind and heart.

Today I draw Dagaz. Its shape reminds me of an hourglass or a geometric butterfly.
Part of the traditional Germanic Futhark or runic alphabet, it is one of the eight runes under the patronage of the warrior god Tyr.

Using free association, its shape reminds me of the name of the chaotic, powerful god Dahak from the television series Xena: Warrior Princess. Although Dagaz is certainly not dark and evil like Dahak, its transformative power may seem earthshaking to the one experiencing it. It signals a major breakthrough, a high level transformation. Think about the words breakthrough and transformation. Transformation is alchemical magic. You are being created anew. Breakthrough is when the sun, after a long period of being obscured by clouds, suddenly reappears in all its glory. The moment may not feel comfortable. You may be temporarily blinded by the intensity of the light. You may have been so accustomed to the darkness or the low light that you can’t even look up at the sun’s brilliance right away. But you will, for your day has come. You must trust in the process and your readiness to handle it. Remember, transformation is hard work.

Drawing Dagaz, I can tell this is a momentous time for me. I need to greet the changes with an open mind and a heart of joy.

I hope you enjoyed our look at Dagaz, the Rune of the Day. What’s on your mind after reading this?

More: The Book of Runes by Ralph Blum

Cheers & Happy Reading!
Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

Tuesday Tales: Writing Tree

Welcome to Tuesday Tales, a weekly blog featuring diverse authors who post excerpts from their works in progress based on word and picture prompts. We’re a book hungry troop that enjoys reading as much as you do. Today our word prompt is tree. My excerpt is from one of my books in progress, Hannah’s Haint, a vintage paranormal romance set in a small town in the 1950s. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

Hannah tossed down her pencil and pinched the bridge of her nose. Bookwork had never been her favorite pastime. A contemptuous chuckle escaped her lips. No one was around to hear her thoughts. Who did she think she was kidding? She’d never kept financial records in her life before she came here. Her gaze settled on the newly polished wooden floor. Shadows cast by the lone chandelier obscured the sheen. The long knives of dusk. She hated it and always made sure to be outside when it came. She wanted to absorb every last glimmer of sunlight. Let night fall like a curtain rather than fade like a song. Now the twilight always seemed to creep up on her before she could get to the open air.

She pushed the chair away from the desk. That air suddenly seemed a necessity. The screen door squeaked on her way to the outside landing, further unsettling her nerves. Why couldn’t Buster take care of things without her having to remind him? Her father would never have stood for it. Her father. His death already seemed a lifetime ago, the world she’d known a distant dream. Faded like the day. She sucked in a shaky breath. The faint scent of jasmine still lingered. If only she could figure that one out. The coming night cascaded around her. Stars popped out on the horizon, impatient. She had the strangest urge to push them back through their pinholes. The strident ring of the telephone drew her back inside.

“Hannah, this is Meg.”

“Oh, hi, Meg.”

“I’m on the calling tree for the PTA, and I wanted to give you the first chance before I start. We’re working on the Halloween fundraiser, and I remember you mentioned civic involvement. Do you want to be listed as a sponsor?”

“How much?”

“Five smackers for an individual but fifteen if you want the hotel listed.”

“Put me down for fifteen.”

“Great! Thanks so much, Hannah. That’ll put the curdle in Audrey Wyver’s tea.”

I hope you enjoyed the snippet based on the word prompt tree. Thanks for stopping by. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

Cheers & Happy Reading!
Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

Vintage Friday: World Book Day

Stories help create a child. THE book that lit the fire on my passion for reading, writing, fairy tales, and mythology is actually a SET of books my parents bought me at age 3—the Young Folks Library. At that time my mother and father worked long hours at their restaurant business, but my paternal grandparents happened to live with us. From these delicious stories of a princess living atop a glass mountain, a girl spitting out diamonds, and a wise woman bestowing a magical invisibility cloak, my Grandmother Flossie read to me every day with dramatic flair.

By my 5th birthday we had lost her. I will always honor her memory and our spirited story times. Thanks to her and this set of books, my imagination, my inner life, and my magic mirror to the mystical were created.

With World Book Day coming soon, do you want to share what book started your passion for reading and writing?

Cheers & Happy Reading!

Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

 

Tuesday Tales: Writing Air

Welcome to Tuesday Tales, a weekly blog featuring diverse authors who post excerpts from their works in progress based on word and picture prompts. We’re a book hungry troop that enjoys reading as much as you do. Today our word prompt is air. My excerpt is from one of my books in progress, Hannah’s Haint, a vintage paranormal romance set in a small town in the 1950s. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

Roscoe trudged toward Nate with the obvious goal of getting in his face. “I don’t need any smart ass comments, boy. I asked you a question. What are you doing out here at the old cemetery?”

“Just looking around. Most of these graves are in pretty good condition to be so old.”

Roscoe gave him a sideways glance. “Cemetery Association takes care of that.”

“For a buck here and there from the family?”

The older man shrugged in apparent agreement.

“What about when there is no kin?” Nate nodded at a tilted marker half sunk into the ground. “Like that one. Cemetery Association just lets it go to hell?”

Roscoe’s eyes took on a mean squint. “What’s it to you? You’re a stranger in town poking his nose where it don’t belong. You and that snobby ass tart Hannah Ross. Nothing but trouble. Both you need to high tail it back where you came from.”

Nate clenched his fists and swallowed over the burning in his throat. Smashing the pompous air out of the man’s gut wouldn’t help matters. Will power couldn’t stop the words that poured through his lips. “You’d like that, wouldn’t you? She leaves without meeting the deadline, and all the cash plus the hotel reverts to you?”

Roscoe took a final drag and stomped out his cigarette. A satisfied grin spread out on his ruddy face. “So that’s what this is. She’s got your britches in such a wad you can’t see straight. Telling you tales about some robbery or another.” He waved an arm. “Well, go ahead. It’s your party. Look around all you want. Spend your fine Sunday afternoon with the corpses. Just remember one thing. I got my eye on you, Larkin. And on her.”

I hope you enjoyed the snippet based on the word prompt air. Thanks for stopping by. Please visit the other fabulous authors at Tuesday Tales.

Cheers & Happy Reading!
Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic in Romance

Vintage Friday: 17 Fast Facts of 1917

1917

Independence Square NGM-v31-p292

By Ledger Photo Service. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

What made the news a hundred years ago in 1917? The biggest crises involved World War I. Here’s a quick look at the year.

  • Under President Woodrow Wilson the United States entered WWI against Germany and its allies.
  • National Geographic published a stirring photo of thousands of Americans pledging their support to the President and American flag by resolution in Philadelphia.
  • The United States implemented the military draft for WWI.
  • The U.S. Naval Base in Norfolk, Virginia was commissioned.
  • John F. Kennedy, 35th President of the United States, was born.
  • The United States bought the Virgin Islands (then known as the Danish West Indies) for $25 million in gold.
  • Thousands of African Americans participated in a Silent March for civil rights organized by the NAACP down Fifth Avenue in New York City.
  • Germany carried out the deadliest of its many air raids on London.
  • The British royal family changed their name from the Germanic name Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor.
    Mata Hari 13

    Mata Hari. See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

  • German spy Mata Hari was executed by firing squad.
  • Sun Yat-Sen came into power in China.
  • Bolsheviks Vladimir Lenin, Joseph Stalin, and Leon Trotsky seized power in Russia.
  • In New York City 20,000 women marched in support of the right to vote.
  • During a food crisis 400 women with babies stormed New York City Hall demanding action about the drastically rising cost of food. As an example, breakfast for four had doubled from 49 cents to $1.02.
  • Price of a loaf of bread averaged 9 cents; price of a postage stamp rose to 3 cents.
    Juan Carreno de Miranda 022

    Juan Carreño de Miranda [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

  • The 18th amendment was passed, prohibiting alcohol.
  • The Virgin Mary appeared to a number of children in Fatima, Portugal.

What do you think of these fast facts of 1917? What would you like and dislike about living a hundred years ago in the so-called good ole days?

More: https://2001-2009.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/wwi/107293.htm

https://www.nwhm.org/blog/foodiefriday-the-food-riot-of-1917/

Cheers & Happy Reading!

Flossie Benton Rogers, Conjuring the Magic with Romance

 

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